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Saint John, New Brunswick
PARTRIDGE ISLAND
VINTAGE GALLERY

   All images and content below were courtesy of Harold E.Wright from the Heritage Resources and Saint John Community College

Heritage Resources

   The first of thirteen hospitals was built in 1830. 1st Class Hospital: first used by artillery officers as their quarters during World War One Capacity: 150 patients Built: 1914 Demolished: 1955. Item #2 on the map.


   Men of the first contingent of the 3rd Canadian Garrison Artillery, prepare to leave the island for Valcartier, Quebec. The hospital at the rear was used as the officers quarters. Item #2 on the map.


   Men of the 4th Overseas Siege Battery at the parade ground. The hospital barrack at the rear was demolished by fire in December 1917.
   After World War One, Admiral Jellicoe recommended that a 6-inch gun battery be installed for the next war. This did not happen until World War Two had started. Two 6 inch naval guns and two 18 pounder field guns were installed for counter-bombardment, close defence, and support to the naval examination service. This is gun #1.Item #22b on Map

Bessie and Henry Bisson. Henry was later stationed on Partridge Island as a soldier.

Mr. and Mrs. George Bisson with their children, Bessie and Henry.

A school was established on the island to educate the resident children. Sometimes there were up to a dozen students. The schools occupied vacant hospital space, homes, and the block house next to the light house. Jean MacCullam (who later made local fame on the radio and in the newspaper as Jean Sweet in the 1950s and 1960s) taught on the island for eight years, ending in 1930. MacCullam is also shown above.

Henry Bisson's report card of June 1930. He was the first in his class of two students.

In memory of the Irish immigrants who died and were buried on the island in 1847, a Celtic Cross was built in 1927 by a man named George McArthur--who was later buried at the base of the cross in 1932. Item #19 on Map

This picture was taken in the early 90's, its obvious that the Celtic Cross has stood the passage of time well.

Dr. James P. Collins died of typhus fever only 3 weeks after arriving to help Dr. Harding in 1847

The next peak of immigration through Saint John was in the 1890's. Dr. John E. March reported that by 1894 he had inspected 74,906 immigrants and crewmen. Many of these immigrants were Jews from Eastern Europe and Russia.
From 1791 until 1989 there have been hundreds of island residents besides the soldiers and immigrants who had occasion to stay there. The island was their home --where they raised and educated their children, held birthday and anniversary parties, mourned the loss of a child or parent, or entertained the hundreds of tourists who visited.

The Hargrove Home

The McGowan Home

Marine Officers Hospital: Housed mariners Built: 1900 Closed: 1938 Demolished: 1955 Item #7 on Map

This observation post was designed to appear like a summer cottage. Item #20 on the map


   Gunner Phillip McBride wrote in his journal, "We were placed on Partridge Island in barracks and I think it was one of the most dismal places to keep a crowd of men. On fine days we marched up and down by the hours and drilled with rifles and bayonets and on wet days listened to hours of tiresome lectures".

   All images and content below were courtesy of Harold E.Wright from the Heritage Resources and Saint John Community College

Heritage Resources

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