From the very beginning, she was determined to show the swiftness which was to bring her fame. At the time of her launch, before the cheering crowds, the great ship flew down the ways and into the water with such purpose that she could not be held in check. The Marsh Creek mud finally halted her progress and for two weeks she remained firmly held before being set free into her natural element once more. This first restless stirring to be free and flying with the wind was not without a price for the grounding had caused her keel to hog so that it was six inches higher in the centre than at the ends.

   The distortion, however, in no way detracted from her sailing abilities. In fact, many believed it to be the secret of her speed. Certainly, the maiden voyage attested to her good manners and capable performance, for, fully laden with fine New Brunswick timber, and under the command of Captain William Thomas of Saint John, she romped effortlessly across the North Atlantic to Liverpool, England in just fifteen days.

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